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Onlinefunnycentre Aug 07, 2018 Dragon Ball Z is possibly the most popular anime of all time. You know DBZ, right? Goku, Vegeta and company. The fighting, swift movements and intense action. The 30 minutes of dialogue and standing - off which precedes that action. The power levels (over 9,000, of course). The yelling. The powering - up. The hair... most distinctively, the hair. DBZ was a staple in many a human being's childhood. Cartoon Network. Toonami. Watching episodes which aired after school. Excited discussions about those episodes. Fanart. Speculations about who could achieve what transformation. Playing "Who would win?" with the series' primarily male and Saiyan characters. Asking "What would you wish for?" if you had the Dragon Balls. You know which aspect of DBZ completely missed me when I was a child? Their video games. I've spoken about how I started gaming when I was 8 years of age (and of how I'm still doing so, 20 years later)... and yet, I didn't play a single Dragon Ball Z video game growing up. Mind you, my focus was on the video games the NES, SNES and N64 offered at the time; the usual culprits... if you're my age or thereabouts, you know them. Was if that many DBZ games weren't localized (i.e. released in North America)? Perhaps. PSN Gift Cards Onlinefunnycentre for all your discounted PSN cards. In fact, so ignorant I was of the existence of the enourmous collection of DBZ video games which were released over the years, that to date there are only two that I'm acquainted with: Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2, and Dragon Ball FighterZ. The former doesn't interest me, at all; I could never get behind 3D fighting games. Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2's plot, if my memory serves me correctly, also entails a custom character (meh) being involved in, and trying to stop the manipulation of, DBZ's history, as set out in the television series' episodes (meh x2). Since Dragon Ball Xenoverse 2 has never piqued my interest, I was content with ignoring it and every DBZ game which came before it. Then DBFZ was announced. That was a big development. Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite left a sour taste in the fighting game community's mouth. Other than Street Fighter V and Super Smash Bros. for the Wii U (and maybe Tekken 7), the tail - end of 2017 was bereft of highly popular fighting games that captured new players and retained the interest of old ones. There was a 'void' that was ripe for being filled. It filled the stuffing out of that void! Here was fast - paced, high - octane, 2.5D fighting game. Developed by Arc System Works. Published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. Gorgeous graphics. Nostalgic arenas. Fantastic soundtrack (containing selections from the anime itself). 3 vs. 3. Assists. Paying homage to the source material by strictly adhering to it. Original voice actors. That was a big development. Marvel vs. Capcom Infinite left a sour taste in the fighting game community's mouth. Other than Street Fighter V and Super Smash Bros. for the Wii U (and maybe Tekken 7), the tail - end of 2017 was bereft of highly popular fighting games that captured new players and retained the interest of old ones. There was a 'void' that was ripe for being filled. It filled the stuffing out of that void! Here was fast - paced, high - octane, 2.5D fighting game. Developed by Arc System Works. Published by Bandai Namco Entertainment. Gorgeous graphics. Nostalgic arenas. Fantastic soundtrack (containing selections from the anime itself). 3 vs. 3. Assists. Paying homage to the source material by strictly adhering to it. Original voice actors. Dragon Ball FighterZ This was the game that MvCI was supposed to be. DBFZ represents a ball which Capcom dropped, and which Bandai Namco picked up and has been running with ever since. It's true that Capcom still has the Street Fighter series, and always will, irrespective of how successful the titles released under the Marvel vs. Capcom series are… but it is also true, however, that Capcom will forever have to "take that L" regarding how MvCI flopped like a fish out of water, both commercially and critically. (In case you were wondering, yes, there are memes about Bandai Namco beating Capcom at its own game, because of course there are.) DBFZ was released worldwide on the 26th January 2018; the same day MvCI drew its last, digitized breath. The FGC embraced DBFZ and played it religiously. It sold over 2,000,000 copies within the first week of its release. It set the record for the greatest quantity of concurrent players on Steam. It's the fastest - selling Dragon Ball video game ever developed. It received rave reviews, is still massively popular to date, and best of all (or worst of all, depending on your perspective), it 'took' MvCI's spot in EVO 2018, mainly by the process of logical deduction. Shortcomings aside, DBFZ is a superb video game that is loads of fun to play and watch competitive footage of. Dragon Ball FighterZ DBFZ doesn't come without its flaws. Yes, DBFZ does indeed have its flaws, the likes of which became… apparent, as more people played the game and as it became more of a mainstay in fighting game tournaments. I don't participate in these tournaments, but I do watch them on YouTube. I've watched enough videos of DBFZ, where varying levels of competition were on full display, to observe that there are certain aspects of it which are less than stellar. I'll explain by starting with this: the characters of fighting games typically have different styles of play. The two most commonly known playstyles are diametrically opposed. There's rush - down, where you continuously apply and maintain offensive pressure (i.e. normal, specials and strings) on a blocking opponent, until you 'open up' your opponent for a 'hit confirm.' Then, there's zoning, where you place as much distance between yourself and your opponent as you inflict direct and chip damage using projectiles and spacing. DBFZ is rush - down - centric. The very way DBFZ was developed, combined with its lack of defensive options (which include guard breaks, deflects, vanish and not much else), caters to this playstyle exclusively. I'm not sure whether this was intentional on the developer's part as a subtle nod towards the action - packed Dragon Ball Z anime, but it is blatantly obvious. Frieza, for example, is a playable character in DBFZ that is demonstrably meant to be a zoner, but his problem is that he's in the wrong video game. As such, his viability suffers; his offensive pressure is mediocre because of slow normal, and his specials, unless meter burned, aren't impressive. It's not particularly a good thing when a fighting game seeks indirectly or directly stifles a playstyle; zoning was prevalent in Ultimate Marvel vs. Capcom 3, for example, and as much as it may have been reviled by many FGC members (I'm talking about the infamous 'MorriDoom' combination), it was also respected as a legitimate style of play (mostly, anyway) because it represented diversity. Diversity is pretty much always a good thing in life, which brings me to my next point: playStation Gift Cards Onlinefunnycentre for all your discounted PSN cards. DBFZ is overly homogenous. This complaint has multiple layers, the thinnest of which is the gender of the roster. DBFZ's roster comprises of 21 characters, with 3 unlockable characters and another 8 to be released as downloadable content. Of these 32 characters, only 2 are women; Android 18, and Android 21 (a character exclusive to DBFZ). I should point out, however, that DBFZ is a sausage - fest simply because the anime it is based on is also a sausage - fest… thereby leaving little room for grievances, in my opinion. DBFZ's homogeny continues with its protagonist, Goku. Goku appears too damn often in DBFZ. There's Super Saiyan Goku, Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan Goku, Goku Black (Zamasu inhabiting Goku's body), Super Saiyan God Super Saiyan Vegito (50% Goku), and 'base' Goku, who is all but confirmed to be a DLC character for eventual release. The Dragon Ball universe is replete with characters, many of whom many people would have much preferred being made playable in DBFZ than 5? versions of Goku, is all I'm saying. The gameplay mechanics are themselves homogenized. I was genuinely surprised to discover that every single character in DBFZ can: double jump, bidirectionally air dash (forward and backward), Dragon Rush and 'ki' blast (so everyone has a projectile of some sort). Also, the entire roster has 10,000 HP. Those are too many commonalities! Typically, gameplay mechanics are spread across the roster so as to give the characters which possess them some degree of uniqueness. For example, in UMvC3, Magneto had an 8 - way dash and flight capabilities; Chun - Li could triple jump; Super Skrull had a unidirectional air dash; Wesker had a command grab. Imagine if everyone in UMvC3's roster was capable of doing all those things! That would be madness and monotonous. Being selective when it comes to according certain characters a mechanic spices up gameplay and makes it more diverse… as would giving characters different numbers of Health Points. Cell is dumb. I won't bore you with the specifics of what makes Cell the very best character in DBFZ, but I will say this: Arc System Works appears to have taken the whole 'Perfect Cell' moniker a little too seriously. Cell is indeed perfect; he has no real weaknesses to speak of, and his offensive potential is impeccable, bordering on ludicrous. He overshadows a considerable portion of the roster, in a way that could only be toned down with a balance patch. DBFZ has not received any substantive balance patches since it was released in January. Seriously? It's been 6 months. Just nerf Cell already; I'm tired of seeing that green, anthropomorphic cockroach on every single team in tournaments. Enough now. (DBFZ received a patch in May, but that patch, in my humble opinion, was not substantive.) Despite DBFZ's shortcomings, I'm comfortable saying that it's a great game. It's worth repeating that it's a lot of fun, and the ability to choose canon and non - canon characters (i.e. characters which were basically included as fan service) is pretty awesome. Rest assured that in EVO 2018, DBFZ will take centre stage… and it will deserve every inch of the spotlight it receives. If you don't own DBFZ already, and you want to purchase it (but would rather not pay full price), there's a safe, effective and ethical workaround you can take advantage of. That workaround lies in the form of Gift Cards, and with purchasing those Gift Cards from Onlinefunnycentre.com. Through their platform, you can purchase Gift Cards for the PlayStation 4, Steam and the Xbox One (all of which you can play DBFZ on). Those Gift Cards will always cost less than the price indicated on them. For example, with Onlinefunnycentre, a $20 Gift Card will cost less than $20. That translates to savings. Everyone loves saving, so do right by your wallet and buy your Gift Cards from Onlinefunnycentre today!

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